Transportation/Mobility, Accessibility, Connectivity and Safety Measures in Uganda

Transportation is the act of moving goods or people while Mobility is the ability to freely move or be moved. Transportation explains the act of moving something or someone, whereas mobility describes the ability of a person to move or be moved.
Mobility isn’t just having access to one mode of transportation. Mobility is having transportation options, and the quality of those options. Our team defined quality transportation options with these three necessary ingredients:

  • 1. Time. If it takes you forever to get there, you don’t have access to it. You might not always go to the nearest grocery store if the bus that runs past it is always stuck in traffic – you might just run to the convenience store across the street, even though they don’t sell fresh food.
  • 2. Affordability. Transportation options need to be affordable. If your only option is to drive but you can’t afford a car, you don’t have mobility.
  • 3. Safety. If it isn’t safe to walk, bike, or drive, you don’t have mobility. You won’t use modes that are dangerous.

So in short, mobility is access. Mobility is having transportation options that you can count on to get you where you need to go.

Without mobility, transportation is meaningless. Improving people’s mobility should be the goal of any transportation project.

Accessibility is the quality of travel and takes place at the community and individual level through Access Management techniques to provide access to various land uses. It focuses on travel time, travel cost, travel options, comfort, and risk while addressing the needs of all within the community. Mobility and accessibility are considered the “ying and yang” of transportation. The goal is to increase the overall capability of the transit system while not compromising efficiency and ease of access.

Connectivity is the relative location of an object to the destination centers. There are many different levels of hierarchy to connectivity. For example, subdivisions with many dead-end cul-de-sacs may have poor connectivity with surrounding land uses. It may take a long time for a family living at the end of a cul-de-sac to get out of the neighborhood and to the main road right behind their house. The destination might not be that far away by distance, but by travel time it is. Traditional downtowns on the other hand usually have higher connectivity with surrounding neighborhoods. Residential areas designed with streets in a grid format adjacent to the downtown are often well connected with the business district and decrease the travel time and congestion.

Stay Safe on the Road

The growing concern for safety regulation enforcement is attributed to the increasing carnage of road injuries and deaths from road accidents in Uganda. With bad driver behaviors accounting for 80% to 95% road crashes, the study sought to establish whether road communication technologies can improve safety regulation enforcement and deter such behavior. Data was collected from over 798 respondents comprising of traffic officers and analyzed using SPSS. The study also critics the Risk Homoeostasis Theory and makes numerous contributions to theory and practice and also provides both policy implications and recommendations to improve road safety regulation enforcement
Transportation is the act of moving goods or people while Mobility is the ability to freely move or be moved. Transportation explains the act of moving something or someone, whereas mobility describes the ability of a person to move or be moved.

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